As-a-Service

The 'as-a-service' business model has run wild and for good reason. You can create a lot of wealth and prosperity by running a successful 'as-a-service' business. The following templates are all based on this notion of recurring revenue from subscribers. They all work in a bit of a different way and approach the strategy with different logic.


Pricing
All the below templates are included in the purchase above. I will manually e-mail you the download link and it will be available on your purchase page as well.

1. Standard SaaS - This startup model was the first build I ever did and it has been one of the most popular. You can adjust assumptions for user growth, churn, expected costs, and potentially having a one-time setup fee. This is the more simplistic version compared to the ones that follow, but because of that simplicity, many have found it useful.

2. PaaS (Product-as-a-Service) - This is the most recent template that has been done out of all of these and offers the most interesting strategy in my opinion. It involves turning the sales of products into a subscription service that runs on top of the product. The logic for manufacturing/sales/subscribers/expenses is the most advanced from all the things I have done as of yet. You will see some really interesting CaC, LTV, and LTV to CaC results as you play with all the assumptions and timing of things.

2. Mobile App / Website Driven SaaS - This is a more refined version of a business model where you have income subscribers that pay a monthly fee. The logic for revenue and expenses is more sophisticated and it has a toggle to adjust key assumptions to a low/base/high value. The main differences of it from the above include driving user acquisition from a given conversion rate of traffic and advanced distribution summaries for potential investor financing. The expenses are also more dynamic and robust.

3. Freemium - Here is a bit of a different direction. You still have users coming in from a traffic source, but now there is specific logic to convert that traffic from free to a paid service in exchange for no ads. That means it has logic for ad revenue via the free pool. This one has some nice logic for investor distributions as well.

4. LaaS (Lending-as-a-Service) - This is one of the more rare business types but still offers some interesting dynamics. It involves the business of having a platform where people or businesses can offer loans to other people and businesses (often called p2p lending). This shows the way a platform can make money by connecting the two via closing fees and a % of the interest revenue. You can plan on a wide range of loan types on the platform and derive all kinds of interesting things from the assumptions included.

5. LTV and CaC Payback planner - This model is more geared toward any business that has subscribers and some cost to acquire them. It is not a full model but rather focuses in on those metrics and the inputs required to see the most important aspects of a SaaS business.

6. Marketplace - This is not exactly a 'saas' business per se but it does involve getting users to use your platform. The model is focused on fee revenue that you earn by facilitating buyers/sellers to come together. There are advanced fee structures in the assumptions and I think this is really useful for any business looking to create a place for buyers and sellers to come together and transact anything.