Seller Financing Financial Model and Tax Calculator

 This is a standalone financial model built in MS Excel. It was designed to show the entire economic perspective of purchasing something and then selling it via seller financing. Tax effects are included in the monthly and annual summary. All logic is on a single tab for ease of duplication / usability.


$75.00 USD

After purchase, the template will be immediately available for download. This is included in the Real Estate template and lending template bundles as well.

I would consider this an advanced amortization schedule that is smart enough to look at how an amortization repayment performs against an initial cost basis. This is measured in final IRR and shown on a monthly and annual view.

User Inputs:

  • Initial Cost
  • Sell Price
  • Down Payment
  • Resulting Financed Amount
  • APR
  • Amortization (years)
  • Payments per Year
  • First payment date
The final outputs will look at the final cash flows in the eyes of the investor (the one who purchased the thing that is being sold in the first place).

As an added benefit, tax calculations were included. If you didn't know, there are great deferred tax benefits to seller financing. When you originally make the sale, you only have to recognize the capital gains when the principal payments are received. There is a specific way this must be done as well.

For tax calculations, you divide the total gain (total sale price less cost basis) by the total sale price. You then take that percentage and multiply it by the total principal payments received over time and this is what is considered your capital gains tax.

This shows the logic for how the investor will only pay taxes on the gain part of the repayment and the 'return of basis' is not taxed. Note, interest payments are going most likely be taxed at the regular earned income tax rate.

If you want to scale this, you can by duplicating the tab and make sure to keep the annual view with the same start year, but you can change the start month of the seller financing amortization to any date. The annual view will pick it up in the relevant year and then you can easily aggregate all the annual views as needed. I made all the logic exist on a single tab so this can be done easily.

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